A Culture of Collaboration Among Teachers, Therapists, and Parents?

Team collaboration

I often find myself amazed at how difficult it can be to get parents, teachers, and therapists to engage in conversation with each other on topics of mutual interest. I wonder whether lack of collaboration is about not having time; or whether it is a reflection of the belief that working on “my own goals” as a professional is the expected practice within schools? Continue reading “A Culture of Collaboration Among Teachers, Therapists, and Parents?”

R.I.P.—Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking being presented by his daughter Lucy Hawking at the lecture he gave for NASA's 50th anniversary

I just read that Stephen Hawking passed away last night—a great man who did a lot to promote the use of AAC worldwide.

From Daily Skimm:

 

RIP Stephen Hawking. The world-famous physicist and bestselling author died early this morning in England. He was known for going deep on how the universe works, especially black holes. And came up with the idea that they aren’t entirely black after all, but instead radiate particles. Hawking’s theory was a major breakthrough in trying to combine quantum mechanics—which studies the (really) small things in life—with Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity—which handles the big picture. He’s the subject of The Theory of Everything, which Eddie Redmayne won an Oscar for. And happens to have done a lot of his groundbreaking research and writing while suffering from Lou Gehrig’s disease, aka ALS. Which severely limited his physical movements. When he died, his family shared something Hawking once said: “It would not be much of a universe if it wasn’t home to the people you love.” RIP.
[Source]

Mental Health Education for All Grades in New York!

Mental health education: grade school classroom

New York State has passed a law, which takes effect July 1, 2018, that will require mental health education in all grades in New York.  John Richter, the director of public policy with the Mental Health Association of New York State, encouraged educators to think of it less as a new class or topic, “but to update the way you think about mental health,” and include it in existing day-to-day classes.  He stated that it can be integrated into existing health class curriculum, and he said there are opportunities in other classes. “In literature, if you’re reading The Scarlet Letter, you’re going to learn an important lesson about stigma. If you’re in biology and you’re talking about brain synapses, you have the opportunity to talk about mental health,” Richter said. [Source] Continue reading “Mental Health Education for All Grades in New York!”

About the Florida Shooting, Empathy, and Not Being Able to Speak

Empathy: Grieving teen with paper lamp

I was reflecting on the 2/14/2018 Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida, and the massive impact this event has had, once again, on all of our communities: not just in collective grief, but in the outpouring of empathy for the victims.

A young man shooting people randomly at a school seems incomprehensible. Yet, how do we go about helping students and families to make sense of such traumatic events? The easiest solution is not to do anything; but is this an ethically tenable position to take? Continue reading “About the Florida Shooting, Empathy, and Not Being Able to Speak”

What Do We Mean by the Term “Presume Competence”?

Competence: Child drawing

I just read a very thought-provoking discussion between some SLPs on an ASHA discussion forum and thought of sharing my thoughts with you. Frequently in the schools (in case and intervention discussions), we hear about the importance of “presuming competence” of a particular child or individual. As we reflect on this term, however, it quickly becomes clear that there is very little consensus on what this term really means.
Continue reading “What Do We Mean by the Term “Presume Competence”?”